Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Poetry & Music’ Category

v and a marriage

edge2Victoria & Adam are getting married.

An unusual post for Tudor Stuff today – just for once this blog is featuring a modern event. Victoria Taylor – co-writer of Tudor Stuff is to be married to Adam Skerrett on Friday 30th May in Kings Heath, Birmingham.

This post is dedicated with love and great respect to Victoria and Adam. I hope you have a great day & I wish you happiness for the future.

If anyone reading this feels like passing on a message then you are more than welcome to do so!

Shakespeare: Sonnet 116

Let me not to the marriage of true minds
admit impediments.
Love is not love Which alters
when it alteration finds,
Or bends with the remover to remove:
O no! it is an ever-fixed mark
That looks on tempests and is never shaken;
It is the star to every wandering bark,
Whose Worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
Within his bending sickle’s compass come;
Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
But bears it out even to the edge of doom:
If this be error and upon me proved,
I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

Let me not to the marriage of true minds

admit impediments.

Love is not love Which alters

when it alteration finds,

Or bends with the remover to remove:

O no! it is an ever-fixed mark

edge2

That looks on tempests and is never shaken;

It is the star to every wandering bark,

Whose Worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.

Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks

Within his bending sickle’s compass come;

Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,

But bears it out even to the edge of doom:

If this be error and upon me proved,

I never writ, nor no man ever loved.

PS Normal Tudor Stuff Service will be resumed with the next post

PPS Victoria & Adam – sorry for the slightly dodgy pictures – I didn’t have a lot to work with.

end-bit

Read Full Post »

Rosemoor (By Kewlottie on Flickr - Click Image)

Rosemoor (By Kewlottie on Flickr - Click Image)

We are now well into the Month of May, Spring is at it’s height and England never looks better than at this time of year. This Madrigal which celebrates May was written by Thomas Morley  in 1595, the year that Shakespeares Romeo and Juliet was first performed and Robert Southwell was executed at Tyburn.

Now is the month of maying,

When merry lads are playing

Each with his bonny lass

Upon the greeny grass.

Spring (Wanderlust676 on Flickr : Click image)

Spring (Wanderlust676 on Flickr : Click image)

The Spring, clad all in gladness,

Doth laugh at Winters sadness,

And to the bagpipes sound

The nymphs tread out their ground.

maying-1

Fie then! why sit we musing,

Youth’s sweet delight refusing?

Say, dainty nymphs, and speak,

Shall we play barley- break?

Thomas Morley 1595

So that you can also hear the tune I have added this video fromYouTube.  I considered leaving it out because it is seriously naff. I eventually decided it was too funny to leave out. Someone on YouTube likened it to Monty Python and they do have a point! See if you can watch this without thinking of Terry Jones/Eric Idle & co.

end-bit

Read Full Post »

Sir Walter Raleigh

Sir Walter Raleigh

A few weeks ago I did a post on Marlowes poem ‘The passionate shepherd to his love’ – I thought it would be a good idea to include Raleigh’s reply. Raleigh was quite secretive about his poetry and only allowed a few examples of his work to atrributed. It is thought that many are included in anthologies of poetry and there is uncertainty about dates as well as what was written by him or edited by others.

I enjoyed reading this poem for it’s witty and cynical reply to the better known poem by Marlowe. This also gives an excuse to show some really good images taken in the British countryside. These colder, more wintery pictures were chosen to contrast with the earlier post which showed summertime images.

Taken from the Roxburghe ballads

Taken from the Roxburghe ballads

If all the world and love were young,

And truth in every shepherd’s tongue,

These pretty pleasures might me move
To live with thee and be thy love.

Time drives the flocks from field to fold
When rivers rage and rocks grow cold,
And Philomel becometh dumb;
The rest complains of cares to come.

Gathering - by Floato on Flickr (Click image)

Gathering - by Floato on Flickr (Click image)

The flowers do fade, and wanton fields

To wayward winter reckoning yields;
A honey tongue, a heart of gall,
Is fancy’s spring, but sorrow’s fall.

Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses,
Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies
Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten
In folly ripe, in season rotten.

Approaching Storm in December by Paddypix on Flickr (Click image)

Thy belt of straw and ivy buds,
Thy coral clasps and amber studs,
All these in me no means can move
To come to thee and be thy love.

But could youth last and love still breed,
Had joys no date nor age no need,
Then these delights my mind might move
To live with thee and be thy love.

Winter morning 1 by Erasmus T on Flickr (Click image)

Winter morning 1 by Erasmus T on Flickr (Click image)

end-bit-4

Read Full Post »

photo by Ruth1066 on Fkickr (Click image)

photo by Ruth1066 on Flickr (Click image)

edge3

Alas, my love, you do me wrong,

To cast me off discourteously.

For I have loved you well and long,

Delighting in your company.

Chorus:

Greensleeves was all my joy

Greensleeves was my delight,

Greensleeves was my heart of gold,

And who but my lady greensleeves.

Your vows you’ve broken, like my heart,

Oh, why did you so enrapture me?

Now I remain in a world apart

But my heart remains in captivity.

Chorus

I have been ready at your hand,

To grant whatever you would crave,

I have both wagered life and land,

Your love and good-will for to have.

Chorus

If you intend thus to disdain,

It does the more enrapture me,

And even so, I still remain

A lover in captivity.

Chorus

My men were clothed all in green,

And they did ever wait on thee;

All this was gallant to be seen,

And yet thou wouldst not love me.

Chorus

Thou couldst desire no earthly thing,

but still thou hadst it readily.

Thy music still to play and sing;

And yet thou wouldst not love me.

Chorus

Well, I will pray to God on high,

that thou my constancy mayst see,

And that yet once before I die,

Thou wilt vouchsafe to love me.

Chorus

Ah, Greensleeves, now farewell, adieu,

To God I pray to prosper thee,

For I am still thy lover true,

Come once again and love me.

Chorus:

Greensleeves was all my joy

Greensleeves was my delight,

Greensleeves was my heart of gold,

And who but my lady greensleeves.

Most people thinking about Greensleeeves from a Tudor point of view imagine it played on a lute – a round-backed string instrument which was popular from the early renaissance, up until about 1800.

Image from little Miss sunnydale on Flickr (Click image)

Taken from Little_miss_sunnydales Flickr photostream (Click image)

The golden age of the lute was during the 16th and 17th centuries, during which time notated music became the custom – rather than the fashion for improvisation which had gone before.

John Dowland (1563–1626) is probably the most famous lutenist of the era. He is most famous today for his melancholy songs ‘Flow my tears’, ‘I saw my lady weep’ and ‘In darkness let me dwell’. Karl Schumann writes,

The art of playing the lute … was a refined, soft, and at the same time colorful art, in sharp contrast to the agitated times in which it was practised’.

Greensleeves too is a song of yearning and heart-break. No-one knows who wrote it. Some say Henry VIII penned the verse and tune for Anne Boleyn. Whatever its origin it has achieved lasting popularity.

(For more about the history and background of this song click here)

PS – regarding the forthcoming David Starkey TV series about Henry VIII entitled  ‘Henry, Mind of a Tyrant’. Philip Sheppard who composed the theme music dropped us an email to say that the dates for the TV show have been announced.

He also mentioned that the soundtrack will be freely available on his blog from next week & there is a preview available now

Take a look (& a listen) here – the preview sounds absolutely superb!

end-bit-5

Read Full Post »

Portrait considered to be a possible likeness of Christopher Marlowe

Portrait considered to be a possible likeness of Christopher Marlowe

A simple post today – dedicated to Christopher Marlowes (1564-1593) poem “The passionate Shepherd” .  This poem was published after Marlowes death in 1599, although the exact date it was written cannot be determined exactly.

In the near future I intend to contrast this poem (and the brighter and more sunny images) with a further post which will cover Raleighs response to this entitled “The nymph’s reply to the shepherd“.

Drifting by Trapac on Flickr (Click picture) Drifting by Trapac on Flickr (Click picture)
Come live with me and be my Love,

And we will all the pleasures prove

That hills and valleys, dale and field,

And all the craggy mountains yield.

Campsie Fells Stream by alco2112on Flickr (Click Image)

By alco2112 on Flickr (Click image)

And see the shepherds feed their flocks, By shallow rivers, to whose falls

Melodious birds sing madrigals.

There will I make thee beds of roses

And a thousand fragrant posies,

A cap of flowers, and a kirtle

Embroider’d all with leaves of myrtle.

Roses by flash of light on Flickr (click image)

Roses by flash of light on Flickr (click image)

A gown made of the finest wool

Which from our pretty lambs we pull,

Fair linèd slippers for the cold,

With buckles of the purest gold.

A belt of straw and ivy buds

With coral clasps and amber studs:

And if these pleasures may thee move,

Come live with me and be my Love.

Thy silver dishes for thy meat

As precious as the gods do eat,

Shall on an ivory table be

Prepared each day for thee and me.

The shepherd swains shall dance and sing

For thy delight each May-morning:

If these delights thy mind may move,

Then live with me and be my Love.

Sheep on Loch Lomond (Jody9 on Flickr:click image)

Sheep on Loch Lomond (Jody9 on Flickr:click image)

end-bit

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 70 other followers

%d bloggers like this: